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Caesarea Maritima

The ruins of ancient Caesarea are located on the Mediterranean coast, half way between Tel Aviv and Haifa, Israel. Herod the Great built Caesarea Maritima to honor his patron, Caesar Augustus about 25–13 BC.

I visited in July, 2007 while recording footage for an upcoming documentary on the life of Apostle Peter. The book of Acts records that in Caesarea there was a man named Cornelius, a centurion of the Italian Cohort. Peter met Cornelius and converted him to Christianity.

Caesarea harbor is one of the most significant engineering feats of the ancient world, Herod’s engineers filled barges with sand, floated them into position and then sank them in a circle, thus forming the harbor.

Once Roman ships had a safe place to dock, Caesarea became a major seaport. Eventually, time and the sea washed the sand footings away.
www.frakesproductions.com

filmmaker: Tim Frakes Productions

country: Israel

channel: architecture

rating: PRO

views: 10396

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Jerusalem Chapel of the Ascension

Jerusalem Chapel of the Ascension

The Chapel of the Ascension is a shrine located on the Mount of Olives, in the…moreThe Chapel of the Ascension is a shrine located on the Mount of Olives, in the At-Tur district of Jerusalem. Part of a larger complex consisting first of a Christian church and monastery, then an Islamic mosque, it is located on a site the faithful traditionally believe to be the earthly spot where Jesus ascended into Heaven forty days after his resurrection. It houses a slab of stone believed to contain one of his footprints. The grounds also contain a burial crypt near the chapel that is revered by three separate monotheistic religions, although opinion differs on the occupant. Jews believe it contains the 7th-century BC prophet Huldah, Christians believe it to be the tomb of the 5th-century saint Pelagia; while Muslims maintain that the 8th-century holy woman Rabi'a al-Adawiya is buried there. less

Jerusalem: Church of the Pater Noster

Jerusalem: Church of the Pater Noster

The Church of the Pater Noster, is a partially reconstructed Roman Catholic ch…moreThe Church of the Pater Noster, is a partially reconstructed Roman Catholic church located on the Mount of Olives, north of the Tombs of the Prophets, in Jerusalem. It stands on the traditional site of Christ's teaching of the Lord's Prayer. (Luke 11:2-4) Emperor Constantine built a church over a cave here in 4th century, and this has been partially reconstructed. Plaques in the cloister bear the Lord's Prayer in 62 different languages. The church is unroofed and has steps that lead into a grotto where some Christians believe that Jesus revealed to his disciples his prophesy of the destruction of Jerusalem and the second coming. Unfortunately the cave containing the grotto partially collapsed when it was discovered in 1910. The church is located in the At-Tur district of Jerusalem which has a population of about 18,000 mostly Muslim Arabs, with a small Christian minority. less

Jerusalem : Church of the Holy Sepulchre

Jerusalem : Church of the Holy Sepulchre

The Church of the Holy Sepulchre, or the Church of the Resurrection by Eastern …moreThe Church of the Holy Sepulchre, or the Church of the Resurrection by Eastern Christians, is a church within the Christian Quarter of the walled Old City of Jerusalem. The site is venerated as Golgotha (the Hill of Calvary), where Jesus was crucified, and is said also to contain the place where Jesus was buried (the Sepulchre). The church has been a paramount – and for many Christians the most important – pilgrimage destination since at least the 4th century, as the purported site of the resurrection of Jesus. Today it also serves as the headquarters of the Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem, while control of the building is shared between several Christian churches and secular entities in complicated arrangements essentially unchanged for centuries. Today, the church is home to Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy and Roman Catholicism. Anglican and Protestant Christians have no permanent presence in the church and some regard the alternative Garden Tomb, elsewhere in Jerusalem, as the true place of Jesus's crucifixion and resurrection. On the south side of the altar is a stairway climbing to Calvary (Golgotha), traditionally regarded as the site of Jesus' crucifixion and the most lavishly decorated part of the church. The main altar there belongs to the Greek Orthodox, which contains The Rock of Calvary (12th Station of the Cross). The rock can be seen under glass on both sides of the altar, and beneath the altar there is a hole said to be the place where the cross was raised. Due to the significance of this, it is the most visited site in the Holy Sepulchre. The Roman Catholics (Franciscans) have an altar to the side, The Chapel of the Nailing of the Cross (11th Station of the Cross). On the left of the altar, towards the Eastern Orthodox chapel, there is a statue of Mary, believed to be working wonders (the 13th Station of the Cross, where Jesus' body was removed from the cross and given to his family). Beneath the Calvary and the two chapels there, on the main floor, there is The Chapel of Adam. According to tradition, Jesus was crucified over the place where Adam's skull was buried. The Rock of Calvary is seen cracked through a window on the altar wall, the crack traditionally being said to be caused by the earthquake that occurred when Jesus died on the cross, and being said by more critical scholars to be the result of quarrying against a natural flaw in the rock. Just inside the entrance is The Stone of Anointing, also known as The Stone of Unction, which tradition claims to be the spot where Jesus' body was prepared for burial by Joseph of Arimathea. However, this tradition is only attested since the crusader era, and the present stone was only added in the 1810 reconstruction. The Rotunda is located beneath the larger of the church's two domes. In the centre of the Rotunda is the chapel called The Edicule, which contains the Holy Sepulchre itself. The Edicule has two rooms. The first one holds The Angel's Stone, a fragment of the stone believed to have sealed the tomb after Jesus' burial. The second one is the tomb itself. Under the status quo, the Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic, and Armenian Apostolic Churches all have rights to the interior of the tomb. The church is a UNESCO World Heritage site. less

River Jordan baptysm

River Jordan baptysm

Most modern scholars view the fact that Jesus was baptized by John as an histor…moreMost modern scholars view the fact that Jesus was baptized by John as an historical event to which a high degree of certainty can be assigned. Along with the crucifixion of Jesus most scholars view it as one of the two historically certain facts about him, and often use it as the starting points for the study of the historical Jesus. The Gospel of John (3:23) refers to Enon near Salim as the place where John the Baptist performed baptisms in the River Jordan, "because there was much water there". Separately, John (1:28) states that John the Baptist was baptizing in "Bethany beyond the Jordan". This is generally considered to be the town Bethany, also called Bethabara in Perea. A favorite place for Christian pilgrimages to the location of the baptism of Jesus on the Jordan River is near Jericho. less

River Jordan: interview

River Jordan: interview

Yardenit ("little Jordan") is a popular Baptism site. Here, the water flows int…moreYardenit ("little Jordan") is a popular Baptism site. Here, the water flows into the Jordan river, eventually flowing into the Dead Sea located more than 100KM to the south. This site is close to the actual site where Jesus was baptized by John the Baptist (Matthew 3: 13 : "Then Jesus came from Galilee to the Jordan to be baptized by John"). The actual site is presently not accessible. Many Christian pilgrims stop at this site and perform baptism ceremonies, normally in small groups and accompanied by the group's pastor. The following is an interview with one of its founders. less

Jerusalem: Chapel of the Last Supper

Jerusalem: Chapel of the Last Supper

The Cenacle (from Latin cenaculum), is the site of The Last Supper. In Christ…moreThe Cenacle (from Latin cenaculum), is the site of The Last Supper. In Christian tradition, based on Acts 1:13, the "Upper Room" was not only the site of the Last Supper, but the usual place where the Apostles stayed in Jerusalem, and according to the Catholic Encyclopedia "the first Christian church". Thus the Cenacle is considered the site where many other events described in the New Testament took place. The early history of the Cenacle site is uncertain. The original building was a synagogue later probably used by Jewish Christians. less

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10 Best: Berlin- Neue Galerie

10 Best: Berlin- Neue Galerie

10 Best series highlights the best things to do in the top cities around the wo…more10 Best series highlights the best things to do in the top cities around the world. Designed by Mis Van Der Rohe and combing the collections of East and West Germany after re=unification, this Museum house some of the most impressive works of XXthe Century masters from Cubism, Bauhaus, Expressionism and Surrealism. Hosted by Julia Grimpe, a theater and TV star who resides in Berlin. less

Morocco: Scenic Voyage magical Tour

Morocco: Scenic Voyage magical Tour

Morocco is only 10 miles from Spain and its 3 main gateways Casablanca, Tangier…moreMorocco is only 10 miles from Spain and its 3 main gateways Casablanca, Tangiers and Marrakech. Low cost airlines connect them with 2 to 3 hours flights to major European capitals. Casablanca is a bustling metropolis. Its must-see site is the spectacular King Hasan Mosque built right on the Atlantic coast and the second largest in the world after Mecca. The next stop is Rabat, the present capital of Morocco. Plenty to see. Not to be missed is the great Mohammed V Mausoleum with the Hassan Tower. The Medina with its Andalusian blue walls. The Atlantic beaches are wide and pristine. In 1500 bc The Phoenicians used Asilah it as trading port. the Portuguese came in the 15th century and staid for 300 years leaving military fortification. Its position on the Atlantic makes it a great fishing port. Tangier is an international city on the northern tip of Morocco in direct view of Spain. 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Chefchaouen.is surrounded for miles by olive groves is This is also one of the busiest mountain markets town. The Andalousian architecture of white and blue houses can be found in the kasbah and its gardens, at the center of the medina. This is also a dying and weaving center. The famous djellaba, the long garment worn by the men and women of North Africa, was created here. We stop at the Holy City Of Moulay Idriss where the founder of Islam is buried. His tomb is a pilgrimage site for Muslims. Close by is the beautifully preserved archaeological site of the Roman city of Volubilis. From here on to the Imperial City of Meknes. Sultan Moulay spared no expense in creating this jewel of a city, building 40 kilometers of walls, an artificial lake and Bab Mansour, the grandest of all gates in Morocco on the big square which rivals Marrakech with its theatrical events. Fez, was the first Imperial City built in 790 A.D. by Moulay Idriss II. This is the world last surviving Medieval city with great monuments and a sprawling a Medina with the oldest tanneries in the world. Fez is also known for great shopping in its bustling souks. Great accommodations can be found in the Riads, old historic Moroccan homes converted to Hotels. Fez is the home of Scenic Voyages one of the premier travel agencies in Morocco serving all travel from Europe and the US . The drive to the Sahara is 300 miles over the dramatic Atlas Mountains. Here great Moroccan specialties like tagine and cous cous can be tasted in restaurants along the mountains. Erfoud is the beginning of the Sahara. Great empty spaces populated by camels with occasional encampments of nomadic people. A four wheel drive is necessary to get to the the sand dunes of Merzouga. Overnight in a Berber Bivouac sleeping under the stars in the desert. sunrise comes while gliding on camelback on the golden sands of the Sahara . This is truly Spectacular. 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Agadir is a resort town on the southern Atlantic with beaches that go on forever and endless luxury hotels. It is also one of the busiest fishing ports in North Africa, Next stop Essaouira, an 800 year old Atlantic port with a massive fort and charming café’s and restaurants. El Jadida with beautiful Atlantic beaches was a Portuguese settlement from the 15th to the 18th century and it is heavily surrounded by fortified walls. Last stop back in Casablanca. This hectic city slows down on the week-end and this is the last chance to experience the relaxed Moroccan way of life before returning home. Air travel courtesy of Royal Air Morocco Travel co-ordination courtesy of the Moroccan Tourist Board Morocco is a great and safe destination for students, families and meeting planners. www.scenicvoyage.com/ less

Palmyra

Palmyra

Palmyra was an ancient city in central Syria located in an oasis in the Syrian …morePalmyra was an ancient city in central Syria located in an oasis in the Syrian desert, north-east of Damascus and of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world. First mentioned in the archives of Mari in the 2nd millennium BC, Palmyra was an established caravan oasis when it came under Roman control in the mid-first century AD as part of the Roman province of Syria. It grew steadily in importance as a city on the trade route linking Persia, India and China with the Roman Empire, marking the crossroads of several civilisations in the ancient world. A grand, colonnaded street of 1100 metres' length forms the monumental axis of the city, which together with secondary colonnaded cross streets links the major public monuments including the Temple of Ba'al, Diocletian's Camp, the Agora, Theatre, other temples and urban quarters. The Arab castle built 1,000 years after the Romans overlooks the town. less

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Independence Day, Santiago, Chile

Independence Day, Santiago, Chile

Thursday, September 18, 2003 Feeling at home back in Santiago, I threw the cam…moreThursday, September 18, 2003 Feeling at home back in Santiago, I threw the camera and tripod into my backpack and headed for the Metro light rail system. Santiago’s Metro is world class. The stations are clean, large and well lit. The trains run on a tight schedule. Television monitors on the platform tell you when the next train is due. It was independence day, and the streets were quiet. Most shops had closed for the holiday. I returned to the Plaza de Armas to record independence day celebrations. The plaza was mostly cordoned off by police. It is a Chilean Independence Day tradition for the President, the military elite, and other high government officials to attend church at the Metropolitan Cathedral on the plaza square. The appearance of the president comes with much fanfare. Two regiments of Chilean soldiers marched and paraded around the square. One of the regiments dressed in grey ceremonial uniforms with black boots. Their shiny grey helmets eerily resembled those worn by the Wermacht soldiers of Germany in World War II. While the band played patriotic music, I perched myself on a monument and had a perfect view of the plaza. Sure enough, President Ricardo Lagos arrived in an open-air limo. Lagos stood in the back seat of the convertible wearing a grey suit with a broad, red, white and blue ribbon, waving to the crowd. As the motorcade turned the corner it passed just a few feet from my camera. www.frakesproductions.com less

Hidden Lake Forest Preserve

Hidden Lake Forest Preserve

A cold December morning at Hidden Lake Forest Preserve, DuPage, County, Illinois

Nkempte, Ethiopia Choir

Nkempte, Ethiopia Choir

This footage was recorded on a Sunday morning in Nekempte, Ethiopia about 9 hou…moreThis footage was recorded on a Sunday morning in Nekempte, Ethiopia about 9 hours west of Addis Ababba. www.frakesproductions.com less